Archives for category: Computing/Internet
Donald Pleasance as SPECTRE’s Ernst Stavro Blofeld, You Only Live Twice (1967).

Major cyber attack, we are told. “Russian,” we are told.

That latter is likely spin. Our leaders definitely do not want to play up the possibility that the Chinese did it. Or, for that matter, “SPECTRE.”

I cannot think of one reason to believe attribution at this point.

Attribution must be uncertain in accuracy, but certainly manipulative.

Russia is weak, globally; China is strong. So working up an image of a dangerous Russian Bear distracts the weak-minded voting population, allowing our leaders not to confront a threat that cannot likely be overcome.

I mention these things not because they are arcana, but commonplace — or should be.

I would have thought epidemic realism were commonplace a year ago. People are so easily fooled, so easily made to forget what they had known mere days before (amnesia; abulia; apathy). So stressing the obvious is worthwhile. As a counter-agent.

After all, do not forget the context: last week the big story was the cracking of a major Chinese spy ring, which had compromised prominent Democratic Party politicians (Swallwell; Feinstein) and (though almost no one dares say it) the Clintons and (most obviously) the Bidens, too. So the timing of this current disclosed cyber attack is worth mentioning. The spin to play up Russia sounds like a way that (here I turn to complete speculation) Trump can “negotiate” with Democrats — or the Dems can fight Trump, who now has grounds to overturn an election. I mean, think of this: America appears to be at war, what with two major espionage events revealed within one month, and a “Manchurian Candidate” was just “elected” — and one with deeply corrupt ties to one (or more) of the malign powers.

Pretending that the current epoch is “normal” and “safe” would be insane.

I of course have no idea how deep the lies run. Remember, in America, as elsewhere, the chief purpose of an intelligence agency is not gathering information but seeding disinformation. Why? There is a logic to it. We have known what that logic is since William B. Casey explained it to Ronald Reagan. We forget the lesson at our peril.

twv

Scott Adams’s representation of the current bias.

Voting security and electoral integrity would seem to be important things in a democracy.

But of course, for politicians and large interest groups, what’s more important is a widespread belief in voting security and electoral integrity coupled with actual, in-play clever ways to rig and game the system.

I disapprove of electronic voting machines, since such systems have been repeatedly shown to be easily compromised.

The fact that one almost never hears about this is astounding in the way that almost everything in our hyper-politicized time is shocking.

I think there should only be two ways to vote:
1. A secret ballot on election day at a registered polling booth.
2. A public online ballot, completely transparent, with the ability to vote early, and change one’s mind often, right up until election day, at which point your last vote is sealed.

A public, non-secret ballot should be the only remote way to vote, no mail-in ballots or any of that easy-to-compromise nonsense.

I support open, non-secret balloting for the same reason that John Stuart Mill did. I support secret ballot as an option for the same official reason to introduce the method originally.

A person should have some identification to vote, of course. The arguments against such things are amusingly racist.

And a person, registered for online voting, should be able, on election day, to click a button saying one will head to the polling place and vote there. The polling station should be notified and the whole security arrangement should remain secure through sensible protocols. Votes should be hand-counted and the totals should be checked against polling station rolls, as usual.

twv

This week’s podcast is up:

LocoFoco Netcast #19, with Robert Wicks.

It is available on Bitchute and Brighteon (though at time of publication, the video was still “processing” on both sites) as well as YouTube:

LocoFoco Netcast #19, with Robert Wicks.

I am involved in a new podcast. It has only debuted on SoundCloud, so far, but it will roll out to the usual podcast publishers, such as iTunes and Stitcher and Google Play.

Note, “I am involved” means that I facilitate. This is Paul Jacob’s show. In 1999 he began making radio spots, and kept them going for a decade. I was at Liberty magazine at the time, and knew nothing of them, but one does catch up eventually. Which Paul has done — “catch up” — by re-entering the audio/video realm with this new project.

SoundCloud is a superior hosting platform for audio, and I have been using it myself for a long time, if in an excessively humble way. Stay tuned for more podcast projects from me.

The second of Paul’s podcasts put up on the audio streaming service.
Last weekend’s episode of “This Week in Common Sense.”
And now, for something completely different….

Initiative Q is an attempt by ex-PayPal guys to create a new payment system instead of payment cards that were designed in the 1950s. The system uses its own currency, the Q, and to get people to start using the system once it’s ready they are allocating Qs for free to people that sign up now (the amount drops as more people join – so better to join early). Signing up is free and they only ask for your name and an email address. There’s nothing to lose but if this payment system becomes a world leading payment method your Qs can be worth a lot. If you missed getting bitcoin seven years ago, you wouldn’t want to miss this.

Here is my invite link: https://initiativeq.com/invite/SrKsEoy3m

This link will stop working once I’m out of invites. Let me know after you registered, because I need to verify you on my end.

Screenshot 2018-08-25 11.43.00Google has somehow commandeered my Mac Pro’s Safari browser.
 
When I open a new tab, Google shows up, that is, the Google search page.
 
I checked Preferences: New tabs and pages were set to open up to blank pages. So I set the homepage to DuckDuckGo and then set new pages and tabs to open up to the home page.
 
Google still opens up.
What?
 
Google IS EVIL.
 
Is there any other explanation?
 
Maybe this is a result of having switched to Firefox as my main browser, a month ago. The problem does not show up on Firefox. But, alas, Safari works better on a Mac using WordPress, so I still must use Safari every day.
On my G5 running OS X Leopard, I use TenFourFox, of course.
twv

Screenshot 2018-08-25 11.42.42

What I want to see when I open up a new tab: a non-evil search engine page.