Archives for category: SoundCloud

My podcast, LocoFoco, is on a hiatus. Personal issues have come up, the death of my younger sister not least of all. But I have continued to produce Paul Jacob’s This Week in Common Sense, which in one sense is easy: Paul is quite the talker, and every weekend he recaps what he wrote during the week at ThisIsCommonSense.org. Last weekend I contributed a bit more banter and argument than usual, going on several tears myself:

The audio version of the podcast is hosted on SoundCloud, and can be grabbed via the major podcatchers, and some minor ones.

And Paul’s current podcast is worth a listen, too:

The video version will be available in a few hours on YouTube.

But I’m wondering: which alternative to YouTube should I prioritize, and get Paul to use as well? I have tried Brighteon, but it is suppressed on Facebook and even on Facebook Messenger (yes, the company will not allow you to even share the URL with a few friends). Bitchute takes forever for me to upload and get a video published. Odysee/LIBRY seems to be the current favorite alt-Yt video program, but I am dubious.

I am thinking of going Gab Pro and investing in Andrew Torba’s new Gab TV project. What do you think?

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Paul Jacob’s latest podcast is up, in audio as well as his YouTube page. But it is also available on my Bitchute page.

This Week in Common Sense, May 8, 2021.

Professor James R. Otteson, the author of the terrific book Actual Ethics (2006), has a new book coming out at the end of the month, The Seven Deadly Economic Sins:

So he joined Lee Waaks and me for an interesting conversation on the topic of his book:

I chatted with Matt Asher a week or so ago. The podcast is up:

And as a video, too:

Matt has figured out the knowledge/trust issues of our time, and explores the problems in an interesting way. I think you may enjoy this one. You may find it even helpful.

And the UFO talk is not off-topic.

Matt Asher’s podcast is The Filter, and his most recent episode, referenced in our chat, is well worth looking up.

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Anthony Comegna returns to my podcast for his third outing. The video will go up soon, but the podcast is ready on multiple podcatchers and at SoundCloud (LocoFoco.net):

To connect with Dr. Comegna, try Twitter, where he is known as Dr LocoFoco.

The latest episode of the LocoFoco Netcast, my podcast, is online in both video and audio forms. Like the previous episode, we wander into an extra-controversial topic for controversial reasons. I interview Ralph Ellis, the author of a number of books including King Jesus (which I finished reading only after I chatted with Mr. Ellis for this episode) and Jesus, King of Edessa.

LocoFoco Netcast, Season Two, Episode Four: February 21, 2021.

This is a tricky subject, of course, in no small part because many people, around the world, are believers in one of the three major religions herein discussed: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Like Ralph Ellis, I’m not a believer in any of these religions. But, also like Ralph Ellis, I do not think disbelief in a religion gives the disbeliever license to kill and otherwise abuse members of the religion in question. Religious warfare and genocide are despicable things. They are not acceptable when done in the name of one religion against another, or by disbelievers in all of the major religions. We are living in strange times, when the lid that has been placed, culturally and politically, against mass religious warfare could blow off at any moment, leaving us with a bloodbath — and perhaps no civilization to speak of.

But it is also the case that many people orient themselves politically and morally using religion. This has always been the case. Indeed, this is one of the things religion provides: a mechanism (or, if you prefer, organism) for ego-transcendent morality. Now, I believe that the evidence suggests that just about any metaphysical system could provide that service, but undoubtedly some work better than others. Along with Ralph Ellis, I judge Islam deficient in this regard. Though I did not inquire deeply into Mr. Ellis’s “Islamophobia” (a detestable name for opposition to some specific bad memes), or explicate my own, I can with some confidence state that there are crucial components to the Islamic memeplex that enable it to grow and thrive — while not really allowing freedom to grow and thrive. Muslims have been backwards for a thousand years, and for obvious reasons, not excluding the hegemonic beliefs that squelch liberal developments, especially including notions like Dhimmitude, taqiyya, capital punishment for apostasy, and the simple gambit that Mohammad was to be “the last Prophet.” These are all pernicious notions, integral to Islam.

But every political idea set has some truly dangerous notions. Christianity led to our civilization, which has raised world health, wealth and freedom, but embedded in the core Christian notions are a number of incompatible memes, and warring notions can do much damage.

For this reason, I have long treated investigation into the origins of Christianity as more than a matter of mere curiosity.

I have read up and down and around the subject for years. Of particular interest has been what Albert Schweitzer called “The Quest for the Historical Jesus.” This is perhaps most famously instantiated in the modern Jesus Seminar scholarship, though, after decades of reading in this vein, and about Gnosticism as well (Hans Jonas and Elaine Pagels being the two main historians), a certain deep skepticism set in: the main scholars seemed not to get far, leaving the origins of Christianity in a deep shadow.

Ralph Ellis figured out why. He saw something kind of obvious — but one of those “too obvious” problems that, because of their obviousness could not even be admitted by most people as a problem. There was a historical mystery at the heart of the Gospels: why was an apparently insignificant figure like Jesus (a “peaceful” “carpenter”) so significant in Pontius Pilate’s day, and how did he relate to the epoch-making events of the Jewish Rebellion and its suppression by Roman generals (and future emperors) Vespasian and Titus? Something historically huge and “majorly” evident happened in the seventh and eighth decades of this epoch designated A.D., yet the purported most important man of the period, Jesus, is said to have barely made a world-shaking blip a few decades earlier?

Ellis saw that there had been some strategic fibbing. The historical Jesus had indeed been a revolutionary, as repeatedly suggested and alluded to in the gospels . . . and in the seventh decade in particular. But somebody (whom Ellis identifies in a daring and mind-blowing way) had insulated this revolutionary’s true identity by placing him back in time, in history and out of History.

And Ellis has made some astute observations about the accumulating evidence: at the heart of the matter was the astrological changing of the World’s zodiacal odometer, from the Age of Aries (the Ram) to the Age of Pisces (the Fishes), which began c. 10 A.D. And which gave both the Flavian emperors and the Christians their telltale symbols, the Fish:

The sign of the cross took on increasing importance, of course, as the message of personal salvation became central to Christianity. But to Jesus of Gamala — the historical rather than gospel Jesus — the fish was vitally important, for the gnosis at the heart of his variant of Judaism (he was a Nazarene) was ancient knowledge of the precession of the Earth. This was information that the Jews took out of Egypt shortly after the end of the Taurian Age (of the Bull).

Ralph Ellis is the author of a number of well-thought-out, fascinating explorations that upend what we think about the religions grounding our western civilization. His works can be found at his own publishing house, Edfu Books. His “Illumination Lecture” series on YouTube is also worth consulting. I was extremely happy to have interviewed him, now for a second time. The interview, as published now, lingered “in the can” for a few weeks of difficulties, including technical difficulties (I need a decent mixer) and regional (an ice storm hit and I was without power for too long). Now it is up. I hope people can give it an open-minded review, as an introduction to a new way of looking at the beginning of our age.

For, we are all Pisceans, fishers of men. To those who accept the gospel accounts, they will of course not enjoy this exploration, for it is deeply, deeply heretical. Even apostate. But then, I’m merely another heretical apostate, seeking the truth.

I can assure you, I realize that these matters of history and religion are not irrelevant for our age. For one thing, if Ralph Ellis is right, they show that much of our lives has been deeply influenced, if not to say determined, by myth-makers long ago, men consciously engaged in psychological warfare. A grand psy-ops. These propagandists sought to bring peace to an empire by manipulating our species’ religious sense.

And many, many folks do likewise to this very day.

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The LocoFoco Netcast can be found at LocoFoco.net and via various podcatchers.

I help Paul Jacob make a podcast on Fridays. It is the weekend wrap-up of what he does weekdays on ThisIsCommonSense.org, “This Week in Common Sense.” The current episode is up on BitChute and YouTube . . .

. . . and is available as an audio podcast from most podcatchers as well as hosted directly on SoundCloud:

This Week in Common Sense, December 18, 2020.

There has been a hiatus in the publication of LocoFoco Netcast. I have two almost ready to go, and others in dev. But as America continues its rendezvous with the Crazytown Train, I have been a tad distracted.

That being said, I did put the last podcast up in video form:

But it is really just the audio version with some video filler.

Meanwhile, two of my friends featured on the LocoFoco Netcast have developed their own vlogcast/podcast projects. Here is the first of Kevin Rollins’ videos:

And here is Emile Phaneuf’s first audio podcast:

Anthony Comegna has twice appeared on LocoFoco, so I would be remiss not to link to his work at the Institute for Humane Studies. I love his podcast, Ideas in Progress; it is always worth a listen. And I found this one with an anarchist academic extremely interesting:

And don’t forget to subscribe to Stephan Kinsella’s Kinsella on Liberty podcast. Here is his mirror of the audio podcast from my effort, “My Peeps.”

The 20th episode of the LocoFoco Netcast is up:

LocoFoco #20, August 6, 2020.

The podcast is accessible via LocoFoco.net, and using podcatchers such as Apple’s and Google’s, Pocket Cast and Spotify. It is also available as a video on BitChute, Brighteon, and YouTube:

LocoFoco #20, August 6, 2020.

I am getting tired of hearing people tell me how bad Trump is, and also explain why I must wear a mask, all the while they exhibit scant historical sense and no general perspective other than their partisan bigotries.

Maybe everybody should stop talking and go read some books.

Well, it’s an idea. Not exactly utopian. Probably wouldn’t work. But I would be at home with shutting up for a month and only reading. And taking notes.

Anyway, Trump Derangement Syndrome and Pandemic Poop-a-thon notwithstanding, I plough ahead and create another podcast, this time with a returning James Gill:

LocoFoco Netcast #17: We of the Bibliobibuli, July 7, 2020.

And of course it is available as a podcast via podcatchers such as Apple, Google, and Spotify, as well as on SoundCloud (via LocoFoco.net):

LocoFoco Netcast #17, June 6, 2020.