One of the great things about the current pandemic is that it has revealed the astoundingly anti-religious nature of many of our states’ governors — especially Democratic governors, but some Republican politicians, and Democrats in general, as well.

It is rather bracing for a secular person like me to witness the brazenness of their anti-clerical agenda, as shown in their “lockdowns.” I mean, I have always known that the political left has always leaned towards anti-social revolutionary doctrine, and that many seculars (including many of my friends) really, really hate religion in a chthonic manner, full of bile and blood and steaming excretory fluids. But this has never been my bent.

It sure seems the bent of politicians like Cuomo, Pelosi, and Newsom, though.

These pols often pretend to be Christian, but I don’t believe them. I also do not believe the Clintons and the Obamas. By their fruits we shall know them, and if it came out in Wikileaks that Pizzagate were not only true, but also that these folks practiced full-on devil worship, the only shock would be that they believe anything transcendent to their power. For the nature of the lockdown priorities and protocols tip the hand.

Here is Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch showing the angle of the hand gesture, as evident in Governor Cuomo’s lockdown orders:

At the same time, the Governor has chosen to impose no capacity restrictions on certain businesses he considers “essential.” And it turns out the businesses the Governor considers essential include hardware stores, acupuncturists, and liquor stores. Bicycle repair shops, certain signage companies, accountants, lawyers, and insurance agents are all essential too. So, at least according to the Governor, it may be unsafe to go to church, but it is always fine to pick up another bottle of wine, shop for a new bike, or spend the afternoon exploring your distal points and meridians. Who knew public health would so perfectly align with secular convenience? As almost everyone on the Court today recognizes, squaring the Governor’s edicts with our traditional First Amendment rules is no easy task. People may gather inside for extended periods in bus stations and airports, in laundromats and banks, in hardware stores and liquor shops. No apparent reason exists why people may not gather, subject to identical restrictions, in churches or synagogues, especially when religious institutions have made plain that they stand ready, able, and willing to follow all the safety precautions required of “essential” businesses and perhaps more besides. The only explanation for treating religious places differently seems to be a judgment that what happens there just isn’t as “essential” as what happens in secular spaces. Indeed, the Governor is remarkably frank about this: In his judgment laundry and liquor, travel and tools, are all “essential” while traditional religious exercises are not. That is exactly the kind of discrimination the First Amendment forbids.

This signals an important element of today’s leftism that anti-leftists such as myself tend to forget: today’s lefty statists do not hate trade, do not hate business; they understand that they can bully business and leech off big business, at the very least. What they hate is religion, first, and strong families, second — for these inspire loyalty that might resist their statist designs.

twv

N.B. Illustration at top is by James Littleton Gill. This post was written
in late November, but for some reason not published at that time.

. . . as posted on Facebook. . . .

Retirement, especially as guaranteed by government, is the secular replacement for heaven.

It is the funniest religion-buster we have. Social Security is also a great metaphor for one view of Christian salvation: half works, half grace. But I still have trouble seeing the State as Savior, which is the favored model of many people, left and right. Of course, in this analogy, it is on the left that the messianism is strongest, for leftists want (nay, demand!) at the very minimum something like a guaranteed income, which is all grace and no works. I snicker.

Yes, I find our world hilarious.

January 11, 2021, 3:14 PM PST


Just to re-state: Bill Barr did not disclose the FBI’s ongoing investigations into Hunter Biden even while Trump was being impeached for asking for an investigation into the Bidens. How could this be justified? Barr had what seems to me a clear obligation to the citizenry to explain what was really going on. Instead, he let every gullible person in America think Trump was likely engaged in a partisan, self-interested witch hunt, when he really had reasonable suspicion of deep crookery.

That strikes me as cause for Barr to be reviled for siding with the Deep State and against a sitting president for doing nothing wrong.

And now Ukraine has come out with its investigation results. The government says billions are missing and the Bidens engineered the theft.

Yet I notice little talk in the press. We hardly need to wonder why: the press in America is largely a propaganda mill for the Deep State.

A video comment about the origins of the ongoing Ukraine fiasco.

January 11, 2021, 12:16 PM PST

The idea is to liken global warming skeptics to holocaust deniers. It’s a bit misleading because the skeptics/climate realists are the ones who always emphasize that climate never stops changing and has been changing for over four billion years, while the global warming catastrophists try to deny the reality of the Medieval Warm Period (when the Earth was hotter than today) and the Little Ice Age (from which we are still rebounding).

David Ramsay Steele, as quoted by Lee C. Waaks.

Now we skeptics can be called COVID deniers by the same crowd, on a different subject (but with eerily similar policy prescriptions), because we really do have this notion that science is about criticism, and requires considering more than one factor in a complex phenomenon.

January 11, 2016, 7:16 PM PST


The official timeline of the coronavirus outbreak is almost certainly wrong. Instances of the virus (in some form) appeared in the West in pockets starting in November 2019. I had it in February, and I was fairly late to the disease in the valley I live in. My brother had the same, odd illness in December and January, and he’s over a thousand miles to the east. Studies indicate that it was in Europe in December.

This could have huge implications for our understanding of what the virus is and why it has spread like it has. I have conjectures, but it would be mere fun to speculate much. The truth is unknown by me.

January 12, 2021, 4:47 PM PST


Operation Paperclip was a thing. It is a fact. Nazi scientists and technicians were imported into the United States to fill the ranks of NASA, military contractors, the academy, and intel agencies. We have good reason to believe that the disinformation skills of the National Socialists were absorbed into the intellectual culture of the Deep State in the 1950s and 1960s.

This is not a mere conspiracy theory, since while the secrecy was real the program has been acknowledged. And it was vast.

We might want to keep this in mind when considering current psychological operations and Internet speech suppression.

Now, some extrapolations we can make from this are indeed “conspiracy theories.” Joseph P. Farrell’s judgment — his “high octane speculation” that he floats as reasonable and likely — is that the Nazis basically took over America in a de facto if not de jure fashion with the JFK assassination. That seems a big stretch. I know. But it should be judged by the evidence, not our well-programmed “instincts.” Many of our prejudices have been programmed by psychological operations of the Deep State. For example, “conspiracy theory” was a term coined and pushed by the CIA for the media to use to marginalize anyone who questioned the “lone gunman” theory of the JFK assassination.

Don’t be good little boys and girls. You can be adults and question authority.

An afterthought on causation: A group that could incorporate Nazis into it is obviously nasty. A group incorporating Nazis into it, and in high places, offering special expense accounts and subsidies, is not going to be bettered by the inclusion. Indeed, it’s indicative of a direction. And that helps explain why America is such a messed-up place: it anathematizes Nazis but is run like a Fourth Reich, increasingly.

January 12, 2021, 5:05 PM PST


New temporary Profile Image, May 10, 2021. Note: this mask is only a nicety. It cannot possibly affect even a mere bacterial transmission, the grid of its breathing net being too wide. It is a camouflage mask, for hunters. But I use it as a camouflage mask for woke disease puritans.

The mask mandate has been something of a puzzle. From the beginning, we were lied to about mask efficacy during a respiratory virus epidemic. At first, we all remember, we were told not to wear them, they wouldn’t be effective, people couldn’t wear them well, etc. And the studies (and yes, there were studies) did not show any utility in reducing the spread of an airborne viral contagion. But Fauci, whom everyone knows, deep down, is a liar, seemed to be lying when he told us they weren’t useful. He was just saving the masks for the professionals! So it sounded to normal people like they did work, but Fauci got almost no flak for fibbing.

Then came the lockdowns, the Fifteen Days to Flatten the Curve – to save the hospitals from over-flow and professional staff from being over-burdened. We were advised to wear makeshift masks in our few public appearances, and we were told that mask production was up. And well-meaning people chipped in, making and selling and giving away home-made masks. And most of us thought that a 15-day holiday was the least we could do.

And then came the greatest con job in world history. Most people did not blink, sucked it all in like an OnlyFans whore. The governors of the states – and officials around the world – kept the lockdowns past the 15 day limit. In American, the hospitals suffered chiefly from under-use, not over-use, so the whole rationale had evaporated. Yet the lockdowns continued, and Trump’s promise of a vaccine shifted the whole pandemic panic from a coping strategy, playing it as it comes, to an over-arching Salvation Strategy, wherein anyone dying was a tragedy for the world, and how dare anyone think anything about their rights when old people are dying. So we are still in this ambiguous realm of over-reaction in most places, but open society in some places, like South Dakota, Texas and Florida — the latter two where the COVID is not as disastrous as it is in the lockdown areas. Meanwhile, many of us are wearing masks. I find it stupid, and when I look at cross-regional stats, I can see absolutely no correlation between mask and lockdowns with better epidemic outcomes. None. Zip. Nada. Zilch.

So what is with these masks? They are crowd control. Their limited utility is keeping people from touching their faces, as a sort of muzzle — though even this minor effect has not been demonstrated statistically, and I am unaware of any study that demonstrates this effect clearly.

“It cannot hurt” is the best we can say for the policy. But that is not at all true. Look at children who have gotten infections because they are wearing masks all day, because of insane state mandates in public schools. Remember, masks are probably pretty effective in sealing in/out bacterial infections. But that sealing-in effect can be quite bad.

But most people don’t care about that, because they are sheep. We bleat, we do not reason.

May 10, 2021, 2:17 PM


Whereas the traditional way of categorizing the general government of these United States is to list the three constitutionally divided federal branches, with their respective designated powers; and whereas the even more traditional is to recognize the primacy of the states in the federation, nevertheless — I recognize that things have changed, and there exists a Leviathan of competing and cooperating powers, including:

1. constitutional government, as specified in written documents at the country’s origins, and as funded by a variety of taxes and loans;

2. the welfare state, as funded by income earners and spent in transfer payments in Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, and allied programs;

3. the Deep State, as constituting the Administrative State in its more secret realms, in the intelligence agencies and the Pentagon, and, especially, in their semi-permanent “partners” in military and intelligence contractors (the “military-industrial complex,” as Ike put it);

4. the Wide State, as instantiated in the major players in the unions and plutocracy, and in the shallow end of the Deep State, and especially in the corporations and NGOs that gain power by contract and special relationships with the constitutional government, but sans secrecy; and

5. government by folkways, which remains the part I like the most, but which has proved itself recently of being captured by the governments above to quite bracing effects.

May 12, 2021, 1:45 PM


It is worth noting that “social justice” is in complete opposition to liberty in the realm of public policy. Social justice is a changeling philosophy, swapped out to “liberals” while they were barely paying attention in the government-run classes that were designed by advocates of social justice.

There is no compatibility between “social justice” and “liberty.” And when one waxes, the other must wane.

May 7, 2021, 5:14 PM


I received on my author’s page on Facebook a direct challenge to a recent post. I will respond to it here, as soon as my taxes are done. And I unbury myself from mowing the lawn, etc. So: maybe never?

Paul Jacob’s latest podcast is up, in audio as well as his YouTube page. But it is also available on my Bitchute page.

This Week in Common Sense, May 8, 2021.

The puzzle we have all faced when thinking about a deadly contagion is: why doesn’t it just kill off every last one of us?

From this question epidemiologist launch into their very interesting study of the evolution of viruses. As if conforming to some law that Epicurus identified when he said our worst pains prove to be of brief duration while the long-lasting pains be not so intense, the worst viruses tend to kill off their hosts too quickly to spread themselves widely. So there is a natural limit to the worst viruses.

Now enter a prophylactic “vaccine” that does not prevent infection or, we are told, spreading of the infection: it just allows the infected to feel less put-upon by the disease. It will save some lives, undoubtedly, by lessening the virus’s effects.

But it will allow deadly viral variants to live longer in their hosts to spread to those with weakened immune systems. It will make a super-virus.
What’s not clear to me is whether this protects the vaccinated much, in the long term.

I gather it sets up an arms race. Pfizer and Moderna both are talking about booster shots and constant updates.

So, this is what it LOOKS like to me: Vanden Bossche is probably right. That is, immune escape is going to happen — is probably happening now in “the more dangerous variants” that Fauci yammers on about. This will first affect the NON-vaccinated. Killing millions. Then there will be the blowback onto the vaxxed. There will be hysterical demands for more and more R&D in genetic treatments. Politically, we will achieve a new level of governance: the medical-industrial complex. There will be scant freedom of association, and your travels will be restricted and tagged.

Our civilization will, if it survives, become mostly virtual — as in Asimov’s The Naked Sun — and we will cease exist as a social species. It will be all virtual-social.

If this be correct, it is already too late. The die is cast. We are in this rut. There is no “going back.” We are committed to transhumanist/posthumanist manipulation of the genome, because that is where these simple mRNA pseudo-vaccines will lead us, through their failures.

The evolution of the virus is going to lead us to a weird stefnal future that I only read about in the past.

I could of course be wrong. This is merely the scenario that fits closest to what I have understood of epidemiology for years. I’d love to be wrong. I do not particularly want to die within the next few years. But to accept a correction I would actually have to see it and understand it. In other words, I would have to see some actual science in place of all the cowardly bullying groupthink promoted by CNN and the CIA and women wearing masks as they jog.

twv

Belgian economist whom I often mention on social media.

I prefer Gab and even Flote Beta to other social media apps:

And Paul Jacob discusses a relevant subject on Common Sense today:

In all the talk of “social media” — their psychological effects on us; their political power; their abusive treatment of our privacy and our loyalty — one thing does not get talked about enough: that social media’s chief utility for many of us is not social at all.

Facebook, YouTube, SoundCloud, Twitter, Gab, Instagram, Quora — these are personal databases. 

Databases on the Cloud, sure; databases open to the public and open to paying advertisers, surely (that’s how the media giants make money while providing us with a free service). 

But they remain databases. And, as such, they allow us to log our interactions with both online and physical worlds, storing our photos, videos, audios, links, thoughts, questions & answers, and more, so we may retrieve them later for whatever projects we may be engaged in.

This is no small thing if you are in a “business” like ThisIsCommonSense.org, where mining what I read two weeks ago can turn into something I need tomorrow. 

Trouble is, the search features of most social media services . . . well . . . don’t find much. It is often devilishly hard to find that article one linked to last April, or November, or . . . was it December? The search features to one’s own entries (as well as others’) should be much more robust. Inventive. Useful. 

It would be nice if the social media companies that mine our data for their pecuniary advantage would also allow us to mine our data . . . for our more humble purposes.

So, take this as advice to alternative social media developers, like the Flote app: if you are literally providing a database for clients (and not true P2P functionality), then give search features more serious attention.

So that we can quickly find and re-share our most sublime cat photos.

This is Common Sense. I’m Paul Jacob.

“Cats’ Pajamas,” ThisIsCommonSense.org, April 30, 2021.

These apps do have indices and search functions, but not very good ones. And Facebook’s most recent upgrade made it harder for me to find stuff on it. Not easier. I wish Gab and Flote the best, though.

twv

Yesterday was a day of low tide. This is the kind of photo I tend to share on social media.

Some people in society will always be bullies, tricksters, frauds, and terrorists.

The classical theory of the state has it that government is instituted to protect good citizens from the depredations of the Bully and Trickster class, and is made up of fine, upstanding leaders — heroes all! — in pursuit of this noble aim.

The Trick-or-Treat, or Halloween, Theory of the State has it that the state is made up of those bullies, tricksters, frauds and terrorists. By organizing into politically governing bodies, and accepting our bribes (taxes, not candy), their behavior becomes less obviously anti-social than otherwise (as is the case with tricksters participating in Halloween’s “trick-or-treats” tradition). The big conceit is that it is good and noble people who work for the state, get money from the taxpayers, and push us around, etc.

The comparatively minor conceit can be found in a certain core group of activities in which the members of the Bully and Trickster class police their own, taking away a fraction of the worst offenders — but mainly the ones who bully and trick independently, who won’t “play along.” This secondary function apes the classic theory of the state, as children mimic devils at Halloween. Serious protection rarely emerges.

Unfortunately, because Trick-or-Treating, er, politics, is made so fun, the rites of democracy and statesmanship so charming, and the rewards so enticing, a lot more people get caught up in the activity than would have otherwise done so. As in Halloween, we wind up with more people spending more money on candy (taxes) than the total loss would be from the straightforward damage done by tricksters acting randomly, unorganized.

The Halloween Theory of the State thus explains both the origin of the state and the growth of the state. This cannot be said of classic theories, such as State-of-Nature contractarianism, which are utopian and deludedly romantic in character.

The Halloween Theory can be extrapolated beyond the mere sketch provided here. The chief problem with it is that the title’s holiday/festive parallel suggests understatement. Children begging for candy are harmless. Mostly.

The state is not.

twv, October 31, 2010

The Libertarian Standard

France will fall — I have been saying this for ages, but “fall” is too autumnal.

France will likely become an Islamic state, filled with murderous purges and genocide and, in the end, tyranny, especially including against French women. Houellebacq’s Submission scenario is rosy compared to what’s coming.

Here is the latest, from The Daily Mail:

Emmanuel Macron has threatened to punish generals who signed an open letter warning that the country is heading for ‘civil war’ because of radical Islam.

Twenty retired generals, as well as several serving soldiers, signed the letter which warned that failure to act against the ‘suburban hordes’ — a reference to the predominantly immigrant population of the housing estates which surround French cities – will lead to deaths ‘in the thousands.’

“French generals who called for military rule if President Macron cannot stop ‘Islamists’ from ‘disintegrating society’ will be punished, government declares,” DailyMail.com, April 26, 2021, updated April 27, 2021

It is absolutely vital to the functioning of a republic for the military to stay out of everyday politics. On the top level, of course, that old custom is often merely honored in the breach in America and elsewhere. But the military is warning, in this case, of something else absolutely central to the functioning of a republic: a cultural commitment to the rule of law amongst the citizenry. In France, and in America, mob rule is becoming all too common. Several major factions in France — long known for political crowd action — go beyond protest. But in America we hear little of it, except when some Muslim manages to kill dozens of people at a time. But there is also antifa violence, and then there is the Yellow Vest movement. But here across the Atlantic, we know little of all this.

Of course, in America we have our BLM/antifa riots, we have milquetoast protests mirroring the Yellow Vests (including the milquetoast and likely false-flag event of January 6), and we have a much smaller Muslim population, which so far limits its members to the occasional spree murder event. But it is all much worse in France.

But caution. The gods may be chortling. There is a sort of poetic justice to the nature of the French predicament. The country has the continent’s largest Muslim immigrant population. And it is considered “right-wing” even to worry or warn about the dangers therein. But note: it was right-wingers who insisted on the Algerian occupation. France would not have the huge Muslim influx were it not for right-wingers and their foreign adventurism.

This is why “right-wingers” cannot be trusted. Like left-wingers, their preoccupations are dangerous and their lust for extending power tends to lead to mass murder in the end.

twv

Typhoid Mary has loomed over the last year in the form of a suspicion: could SARS-CoV-2 be spread by asymptomatic carriers, like Mary Mallon was for typhoid?

A lot rests on this fear. Most of the lockdown policies, for example. 

Why should healthy people keep a six-foot distance from other healthy people, or wear masks, if there are few or no people spreading the disease while not knowing they are infected?

The whole extreme mitigation craze began a year and a month ago with the “Fifteen Days to Flatten the Curve” ploy. The curve to be flattened was of dire cases necessitating hospitalization. The policy was to prevent hospital over-crowding. That didn’t happen, but the measures were kept. 

And fears of asymptomatic spreading of the virus helped fuel the idea that we — “as a society” — could fend off the worst casualty rates until a “vaccine” could be developed. Now we have a few vaccines, and it has been like pulling teeth to get the CDC to allow the vaccinated some freedom of association.

You probably have heard about studies alleging prevalence of asymptomatic spread of COVID. Most of these studies seem pretty iffy to me, and the best study almost conclusively indicates no such epidemiology — “no positive tests amongst 1,174 close contacts with asymptomatic cases.”

Now, Mary Mallon, the original asymptomatic superspreader, spread typhoid by handling food that she prepared for others. After years of back-and-forth, she was basically imprisoned for 27 years. In America, you might think that a taking of her liberty for the public good would have instituted a system for her compensation. But that was not really done.

Just so, this last year: the liberty taken away from the productive many for the benefit, chiefly, of immune-compromised few, was not handled as a free society would.

Will there be progress?

Not so long as the big issues are ignored. Evaded.

Big issues like just compensation and the actual science of the spread of disease. Were there a case for quarantining people, preventing them from engaging in commerce, the ones who lost incomes from such quarantine should surely be compensated according to the Takings Clause of the Constitution. But almost no one mentions that.

The takings problem is especially interesting in the COVID case because the most at-risk population are retirees who barely lose monetarily, if at all, from “the lockdowns,” while those who lose most — workers and business owners — have the least to gain. This suggests to me that the only halfway reasonable takings/compensation method to manage a quarantine would be to require those who are not monetarily affected by the lockdown orders to compensate those who are monetarily affected in a direct manner. By this I mean the funds to compensate the most negatively impacted should come from those least impacted on a weekly basis, skipping states’ general funds entirely. The least impacted would write checks to a fund that would distribute to those most affected.

Note what this method would do: give immediate incentive to those who benefit most from the lockdowns to oppose the lockdowns when their benefit/cost changes. As it is, in the current lockdown regime, there is not incentive for those who benefit to let up on the request to be benefitted at others’ expense. The state lockdowns compensated for by federal subsidy amounts to an incentive to forever let some benefit at others’ expense. It is the kind of scenario that the Constitution was designed to prevent.

The lockdowns have been just one of many poorly thought-out, irresponsibility-maximizing programs introduced during the panic.

And as for Mary: what should have been done? Well, negotiate with the woman. Pay her off. If her freedom to earn a living was in conflict with others’ health, than the healthy should have paid her off not to work. They would have hired her to “socially distance” — rather than lock her up. Indeed, this kind of policy would not even require a state to manage.

This model should have become the norm. And because it did not, we have lockdowns today that abridge freedoms and benefit some at the uncompensated-for expense of others. Anathema!

And because no one has to pay the direct cost of these policies, the whole pandemic has been one ideological contest sans responsibility. The system actually discourages rational reconsideration of the data. People just choose what they want to believe to fit their situation and their free-floating “values.” A responsibilitarian society would not serve anyone’s free-floating values. Only cost-conscious values would count.

In a free society there would exist strong incentives to look at the effectiveness of masks and other mitigation measures rationally, not in a cultic manner.

twv

Every now and then I search for friends and colleagues with whom I have lost touch. Until today, I had tried numerous times to find Terry Campbell, with whom I worked briefly in the late 1990s, with no luck. I just did a search, only to discover he had died a year and a half ago:

Terry was found in his car, which had veered from his driveway into the woods. He lived near a field where llamas graze in rural Chimacum, Washington, a tiny speck on the map near Port Townsend, not far from Seattle. My heart was wrenched by the news.

Warren Goldie, “A Good Friend Is Forever: Discovering the Terry Campbell Fan Club” (November 30, 2019).

The author of this appreciation for Terry wrote well and meant well, with a boyhood cartoon and a fine photo. I wish I had known Terry when he sported the beard, for, sans beard, he looked eerily like author Stephen King. But Mr. Goldie, the eulogist, was misinformed about the nature of the job for which Terry had crossed the country:

Terry found a job as the managing editor of a libertarian magazine in Port Townsend that promptly went out of business right after Terry arrived. He landed on hard times, working a string of part-time jobs—apartment manager, librarian, custodian. Often, he was down on his luck.

The magazine was Liberty, which I helped found in 1987. The publisher, Bill Bradford, hired Terry largely because I didn’t want the job of managing Liberty’s editorial operations. Terry was fired from the job about a half year after joining; I left soon after. In our negotiations for my departure, Bradford expressed his surprise at my lack of interest in doing the job that Terry had applied for and won. “Bill,” I said. “The job of managing editor is basically managing you. I knew I was utterly incapable of doing it successfully. Terry is the only person I have witnessed pulling it off, professionally. And he grew to hate you. Because you were the problem. Not anyone else. You.”

It was a sad conversation. But after Terry and I left, Bradford managed to find competent help, I gather, for the magazine lasted past Bradford’s death in 2005. So maybe he was easier to manage during that stage of his life. I know I thought the prospect hopeless, and Terry judged it vexing.

Terry was a terrific at his job. Never before had the editorial process at the magazine flowed in a timely manner, without bottlenecks. But the half a year at Liberty almost destroyed him. I always felt badly about that. To what extent was I responsible? For the record, Bradford did indeed blame me. But it was Terry he fired. For what Terry could not do was contain his well-developed rage at Bradford; he could not believe that the toughest part of his job was to get his boss to perform tasks within a rational time frame. I had it much easier, in a sense, for whatever anger I felt at how badly the magazine ran, I felt a dozen other emotions as well. To be consumed by one emotion is not good.

Terry kept my cat for half a year after I left, but I never really kept track of the man, because I was far away and knew I could only sympathize — as I figured it, since I had not tried to place myself as a buffer between him and Bradford, as I had for several others, I was not the person for him to fall back upon. I couldn’t make up for what I had not done.

Besides, both he and Bill were strong-willed, obstinate people. I do not try to control such folks. I do what I can and watch them reap what they sow.

It is a tough world. It is sad to see another Liberty laborer leave us. First Bradford in 2005, then Eric and Terry in 2019. Perhaps I will be next.

twv

The UFO taboo is DANGEROUS even if most UFOs are not

A number of people have wondered why the U.S. Government is changing its UFO policy from secrecy, denial and disinformation to apparent disclosure. There could be many reasons. But there is one we should ponder:

Disclosure is happening for the same reason homosexuality was legalized and there are moves to legalize adult sexual activity with children: for national security reasons.

  1. Homosexuality’s persecution in the west had major Cold War problems: it set up blackmail opportunities for foreign agents to gain spies and snitches. Making gay acts legal and homosexuals themselves publicly acceptable meant that the blackmail route to turn citizens into traitors was largely closed off.
  2. The reason we are seeing increasing interest in decriminalizing and even de-stigmatizing adult-child sexual relations is that such relations become key blackmail opportunities for all sorts of nefarious organizations — and Jeffrey Epstein didn’t kill himself!
  3. UFO secrecy and its continued verboten status has meant that it is inordinately difficult to sort paranormal UFOs from the drones and spying devices of foreign powers. Only by coming clean on the paranormal aerial phenomena can the military properly handle the spycrafts of other world powers.

Yes, I am suggesting that the program of secrecy about one type of craft is being used by foreign powers to compromise national security.

This is a fairly obvious point, but it doesn’t get much play from those who assume UFOs must be one phenomenon only. Very dangerous bias. Most phenomena break down into a variety, once identified. Animals that fly are mainly insects and birds, true, but there also exist bats and flying squirrels and, long ago, there were the pterosaurs.

Anyway, before you theorize too deeply about how opportunistic foreign powers could be, leveraging the west’s secrecy about UFOs against western interests — as if leveraging sexual taboos to create gay spies or pedophile traitors — consider Tyler Rogoway’s recent article in The Warzone. I didn’t spin this notion all on my lonesome:

The gross inaction and the stigma surrounding unexplained aerial phenomena as a whole has led to what appears to be the paralyzation of the systems designed to protect us and our most critical military technologies, pointing to a massive failure in U.S. military intelligence. This is a blind spot we ourselves literally created out of cultural taboos and a military-industrial complex that is ill-suited to foresee and counter a lower-end threat that is very hard to defend against.