Archives for posts with tag: inclusion

TomLehrer

 

I want to thank the “bigots” of Alabama for reacting to the whole “gay marriage” thing in the best possible way: getting the state out of the marriage business. It looks like it may happen.

Of course, marriages will still be created, folks (straight and gay and de facto asexual) will wed. And government will still be minimally involved. But NO LICENSES. Yes, no marriage licensing.

Generally, I hate licensing. A free people shouldn’t need a license to enter into a contract. It’s absurd. An affront to our rights.

So, what will happen, if the legislation passes and is signed into law? Well, “couples will get a ‘marriage contract form’ from the state, fill it out, sign it, declaring that they’re getting married of their own free will, get two witnesses to sign it, and turn it into the government for filing (and give them money). They can have whatever wedding ceremony they want or none at all.” Or so writes Scott Shackford at Reason.

But he also writes: “You’d think everybody would be happy with this outcome, but of course not. Alabama gay groups and the American Civil Liberties Union have to complain, even though they’re going to actually get everything they want.”

Yes, the Inclusion über alles folks are going to whine, but let them. That’s what they do best. Inclusion is the obsession of spoiled children and the weak everywhere (particularly, it seems, in colleges). Universal inclusion is totalitarian. I say get government out of our business as much as possible, and live and let live.

But if you are butt hurt about this, I’m sure you can find a salve.

Mine’s freedom. And the division of responsibility in a free society.


Extra points to those who “get” the [admittedly tenuous] rationale for the title and photo, above.

Matt Kibbe on Hardball

Matt Kibbe on Hardball

The rapid advance of equal rights for gays regarding marriage kicks up more than one interesting problem.

To me it’s an issue of freedom of contract: gay marriage builds directly from the idea of equal rights to freedom.

To those on the left it’s about inclusion, about acceptance by society of minority values.

To many on the right, however, it’s an abomination that will destroy marriage as we know it.

I simply don’t buy this latter conservative thesis. Other people’s peculiar marriages (and I could be thinking of Bill and Hillary’s) wouldn’t affect mine, were I married. Why should gays marrying other gays make much difference for straights marrying other straights?

My “equal freedom” view (which is closer to the courts’ rulings than the “inclusion” obsession) suggests that accommodating polygamy is next. What follows from the “equal inclusion” view? More nasty boycotts and forced recognition, a totalitarian moralism with no possibility of dissent? (There has been quite a lot of progressive piling on recently: the Mozilla CEO ousted because he once gave money to an anti-gay marriage initiative is only the most obvious.)

In that very real context, my sympathies lean towards beleaguered conservatives. Why must they co-operate with practices that they fear, loathe, or despise? May they not express their values?

The solution? Get government out of the marriage business. All long-term consensual sexual unions should be “civil unions.”

Want to call yours a marriage? Fine.

Want a church ritual? A parental blessing? A lexical imprimatur?

No more of the government’s business than a fancy wedding or elopement.

Matt Kibbe, head man at FreedomWorks, recently surprised Chris Matthews on Hardball with  this notion: No state license needed to “get married.” Matthews’s incredulity was cut short by his guest reporter backing Kibbe up: “Lots of people, like Rand Paul, are advocating that now.”

It could be a way out of the Pandora’s Box that “equal inclusion” threatens to unleash.