We train our enemies.

This seems to me the most important lesson of conflict.

So if you see your enemy going berserk, you should wonder if you drove your enemy to extremity. And your enemy, likewise, drove you to the place where you drove him bonkers.

The Law of Nemesis may seem mysterious, but its working have been noticed since ancient times.

We should study this, carefully. It is in all of our interest to do so.

But the first step is to consiser the possibility that you are almost certainly at least partially in the wrong.

As is your enemy.

This truth, however, isn’t nearly as shocking as its inverse: that your enemy is likely at least partially in the right.

Where can we learn of this? Sun Tzu; von Clausewitz?

One might turn from conflict theory to metaphysics:

We too often forget that not only is there “a soul of goodness in things evil,” but very generally also, a soul of truth in things erroneous. While many admit the abstract probability that a falsity has usually a nucleus of reality, few bear this abstract probability in mind, when passing judgment on the opinions of others. A belief that is finally proved to be grossly at variance with fact, is cast aside with indignation or contempt; and in the heat of antagonism scarcely any one inquires what there was in this belief which commended it to men’s minds. Yet there must have been something. And there is reason to suspect that this something was its correspondence with certain of their experiences: an extremely limited or vague correspondence perhaps; but still, a correspondence. Even the absurdest report may in nearly every instance be traced to an actual occurrence; and had there been no such actual occurrence, this preposterous misrepresentation of it would never have existed. Though the distorted or magnified image transmitted to us through the refracting medium of rumour, is utterly unlike the reality; yet in the absence of the reality there would have been no distorted or magnified image. And thus it is with human beliefs in general. Entirely wrong as they may appear, the implication is that they germinated out of actual experiences—originally contained, and perhaps still contain, some small amount of verity.

More especially may we safely assume this, in the case of beliefs that have long existed and are widely diffused; and most of all so, in the case of beliefs that are perennial and nearly or quite universal.

Herbert Spencer, First Principles (1862; 1867), opening argument.
Herbert Spencer (1820 – 1903)
The Masks Do Not Work; Lockdowns Are “Medieval”

You can stop freaking out now. Watch this video by Ivor Cummins and come to the understanding: THIS WAS ALWAYS KNOWN.

The alarmism was pushed mainly by people who did not know much epidemiology. But there were “scientists” who pushed alarm — including geniuses like Taleb — because they, well, I won’t speculate.

Not being a scientist myself, it took me a while to remember what I had once known. But the shape of those curves: that was known.

So the pandemic panic was perpetrated — pushed onto the population — by people with politics in mind: propagandists. Folks who still pretend we need to change the way civilization works because of this new variant of a virus have embraced error and propound social poison.

Give it up. Those who now understand a bit of the science must resist EVERY political-governmental “lesson” promoted by the alarmists. It is a power grab by the power mad.

No more madness, please. Reason is the answer. A “casetemic” does not a viral pandemic make. But it does make for the madness of crowds, the formation of mobs, and general memetic contagion.

Nevertheless, you can still find “studies” puled in the press purporting that SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 are grave transformative dangers. But what is actually transformative? Ignorance, error, misunderstanding, and lies.


Ivor Cummins considers something I’ve been saying for a few months now, and he considers it a reaonable hypothesis: to the minor extent masks and social distancing have an effect, they may very well be negative. Stay through to the end of the video. 

It’s a bit of a puzzler, though, since one would think masks and other mitigation efforts would alter the curves if effective, and since they did not, how can they alter summertime normal acquisition of immunity?

I’m very curious how this will play out.

But remember: there appears to be scant evidence that mitigation really “flattened the curve.” For we have the data. This doesn’t need to be argued over in white heat. Just look at the data, folks.


And by the way? Cummins calls this latter effect of summertime mitigation in the form of an increased wintertime death toll as “unintended consequences.” I’m iffy about that. I think there are indeed people in government who know this very well and have been pushing it for this reason. They want more deaths in the winter, to call a “second wave” and therefore increase your political demand for mandatory vaccinations, complete with Bill Gates’s nanotechnology to track you.

Normal Americans have lost an important political skepticism, and become bleating ruminants.

I always think that life is like a fairytale. What should I do to come out from this assumption?

…as answered on Quora….

You could do worse. Fairy tales are folk horror stories so concisely told that usually their morals are fairly easy to discern. In fairy tales dangers abound. Magic is not the power of wish, but potency at great cost. Sometimes good triumphs, but only after a huge setback. Sometimes fairy stories are very sad. Even frightening.

Read the Grimms, Hans Christian Andersen, and Italo Calvino’s collection of Italian Folktales. I do not think you will come away from them with a need to purge them from your imagination, but with some wisdom you can apply their lessons to your life.

You will notice differences between them and your life. The dangers in the woods in the old European fairy tales can at best serve as metaphors for today’s dangers, and the malign and delusive magics in those stories need to be translated to somewhat more mundane if still quite potent dangers, such as fraud, ideology, and so much else of word work and imaging.

My favorite American writer is James Branch Cabell. In his The Rivet in Grandfather’s Neck: A Comedy of Limitations (1915), Cabell synopsizes a sad little Hans Christian Andersen story and then tells a romance set in Virginia (or “Sil.”) in the early 20th century. There you will see a master take a fairy story and apply it to life. After reading that book, I trust you will see a way to transcend superficial “fairy tale” mentality, and grow beyond naïvety. And in “The Music from Behind the Moon: An Epitome” (it can be found in The Witch-Woman: A Trilogy about Her [1948] and elsewhere) you may conclude that a fairy-tale vision is in no way enviable, but also, perhaps, not evitable. The themes in fairy tales are the stuff of life.

If you “always think of life as a fairy tale,” my suggestion is: study fairy tales.

For what I think you really mean is that you tend to think of life as offering up temptations as the magic in fairy tales tempts those that encounter it. If you look at the literature of fairy tales, you will see that in story as in life the magic is not what it seems.


https://guides.library.vcu.edu/cabell/cabell_bibliography

Hans Christian Andersen
My choice of a lit match as a logo for the podcast may seem eerie now.

“most if not all of the fires appear to have been human-caused”

I smell the smoke. My dog does, too, and he goes outside on barking fits more often, and longer, these last few days.

Yes, I live amid the trees of the Pacific Northwest. And all around me, even by the Pacific Ocean, there are fires. Multiple fires. A sister of mine has been forced to abandon her house in Oregon. Refugees for fires are filling up hotels and motels in many, many counties. Whole communities have been destroyed.

It’s like the California hellscape.

Meanwhile, the reporting is predictable:

What was already a historic, horrifying start to the 2020 fire season out West is continuing to get worse. Amid unprecedented weather conditions linked to climate change, numerous fast-moving heat and wind-fueled wildfires in multiple western states have in recent days burned hundreds of thousands of acres, besieged countless communities, blanketed the region with hazardous smoke, and in the case of one fire in California, necessitated multiple dramatic helicopter rescues of groups of fire-encircled campers.

Chas Danner and Matt Stieb, “The West Coast Wildfire Season Is Getting Worse,” New York Magazine Intelligencer, September 9, 2020.

“Unprecedented” is — by the Law of the Precedented Unprecedent — a misnomer. There are plenty of precedents, in terms of the weather and in terms of the fires. More ominously, more malign forces are at work, as can be seen by this sentence about my state, The Evergreen State:

Unfortunately, most if not all of the fires appear to have been human-caused. More acres burned in 24 hours than the state had seen in 12 fire seasons combined, according to Governor Jay Inslee.

Ibid., emphasis added.

Notice how human causation is mentioned, but terrorism by persons suspected but specifically unknown gets no mention.

I posted about the possibility of terroristic arson on Facebook tonight. In lieu of a long essay here, I’ll just present my posts as images. Especially since there’s a high likelihood that I will be de-platformed soon.

And so begins my campaign on Facebook to alert my friends to a major event.
I may have started here on LocoFoco.us, a Facebook (hereinafter Fb) page James Gill and I run. Why Fb says Mr. Gill posted this I don’t know, for I definitely wrote that!
Carrying on the conversation, with James Gill and our friend Daniel joining.

And then I wrapped up the night with a general essay on the nature of how to not be fooled by the psy-ops of our Archons:

Whether Fb will de-platform me soon, or by Fb at some planned future deluge of de-platformings, as specified by Daniel, above, I do not know, of course. This is the reason I post these conjectures and musings here. Part of what we are dealing with is a vast left-wing conspiracy. And Hillary Clinton, who dubbed the campaigns against her and her husband a “vast right-wing conspiracy,” is part of it. But maybe not a very big part.

What is relevant is the freak-out over Trump’s election in 2016, and the absolute panic that the insiders are in that someone who is as outsider as he could have risen to the top.

I still often muse that this may have happened in a large, secret war between Deep State factions, with a Pentagon faction having chosen Trump and the intelligence wing choosing the pedophile faction (Democrats). But that sounds so QAnon that I hate even to broach it.

But my sniffer tells me that is the case.

We may soon see. Or civilization may fall. Either way, it will be interesting.

twv

As someone who, when young, developed ideas that were not present in my family, church, or school environments, the idea that people are expected to conform to ideas merely associated with some in-group they cannot help but belong to (and as a kid, there were few opt-outs for me, practically, to family, church, or school) is bizarre. And possibly insulting.

Yet the woke folk insist that the African-American descendants of slaves are only authentic to their true selves when they adopt wokist race theory and some variant of socialism. When a white woke neighbor recently accused non-woke whites of being racist for their skepticism about Black Lives Matter, I mentioned that many blacks hated BLM. One lackwit retiree was incredulous, wanting proof. It is probably one of my many character faults that leads me rarely to provide such evidence. The examples are many and varied, so if you have not seen them, you know you have bubbled yourself in a tightly sealed ideologically secure media container, I typed back. When my white woke interlocutor restated his demand, I responded, Do your own homework.

It had apparently not crossed the mind of this white woke joke of a fool that his very expectation of black uniformity of opinion based merely on a name is the acme of condescension.

I like to joke that White Privilege consists in ONE THING ONLY: the expectation that no opinion inheres to us by reason of race.

But that is a problematic thing to joke about, seeing that we are told incessantly that white privilege does not include the privilege of not being racist.

twv

The photo, taken from Facebook, shows the red-head holding a baby goat in her arms, smiling. 

A big, lovely grin; cheerful, charming. 

She appears to have a great life ahead of her, backed up by wealthy New York City professional parents — her mother an architect, her father a child psychiatrist. You might think she has every reason to smile.

But no.

You see, she faces criminal charges. 

“Clara Kraebber, 20, is one of eight people arrested Friday night after a roiling, three-hour rampage that police say caused at least $100,000 in damage from Foley Square up to 24th Street,” reports the New York Post.*

Six years earlier she had been quoted in the New York Times explaining her participation in a Manhattan rally held in solidarity with the Ferguson, Missouri, protests. “We don’t have much political power right now, being youths, but this is something we can do.” The Post identifies the Ferguson cause célèbre as “police-brutality casualty Michael Brown,” not mentioning that the “hands up”/“don’t shoot” meme that spurred the protests was false witness by a bystander, that Mr. Brown had been recorded earlier in the day committing a crime, and that multiple official investigations had concluded Brown had attacked the officer who shot him.

Not police brutality at all. The protests which drew Ms. Kraebber into a life of woke criminality were based on untruths. 

So if you want to shift blame onto someone else for her wilding vandalism, shift the blame to all those who, to this day, repeat the lie about an innocent Michael Brown.

A good girl gone bad because adults prefer their ideological narrative to the truth.

She could actually go to jail. Is she paying for your sins?

twv

* “Every city, every town, burn the precinct to the ground!” the group [had] chanted as it moved up Lafayette Street while busting the plate glass facades of banks, Starbucks and Duane-Reades,” the Post tells us.

Is libertarianism or authoritarianism a better government model to build a strong community?

…as answered on Quora….

Three terms here are easily disputable: libertarianism, authoritarianism, and community.

I shall stipulate, at the beginning, “libertarianism” to be the body of individualist thought running from classical liberalism to private property “voluntaryism” (panarchism, or anarcho-capitalism); “authoritarianism” is either (a) statism in some form that makes no pretense for democratic/republican control or (b) any system of governance in which command dominates over rational deliberation, general rule-following (rather than command-following) and compromise; and “community” I take to be society above the family/clan level based on propinquity or regular interaction, but not society at large, and certainly not either the “open society” or “the nation.”

In tribal life, all there was, basically, was family and community — and other families and communities, and individuals wandering among them, trading, gambling, and fighting.

In chiefdoms we see a coalescence of a kind of political governance, and in the early conquering states and watercourse empires we see vast populations with many communities integrated under authoritarian political and ecclesiastical governance.

Were they “strong communities” way back when? To some extent they had to be. But as military organization gave way to industrial institutions, with extensive scope for trade, the nature of both family and community shifted. Liberal ideas came to dominate, becoming quite explicit. In the 1830s, the most advanced form of “democracy” was in the new United States, and Alexis de Tocqueville was most interested in community in that egalitarian context. They were astoundingly vibrant, he found. People set up committees to make community projects when business activity could not fill the perceived need and where government was not even thought of to provide it. I used the word “egalitarian,” for it was “equality of conditions” in America that most astounded Tocqueville. But by this he did not mean equality of wealth, or even opportunity. He meant openness to social movement, a lack of class stratification (as in Europe), a leveling of ceremonial expectations and a lack of pretentiousness in the rich over the poor. What he meant was an amazing degree of liberty, which was his chief interest. What he saw in America was remarkably libertarian, in the sense I stipulated above, for the heyday of classical liberalism was about to dawn with the rise of the LocoFocos and the advance of both free trade and abolitionism.

Community then was voluntary community. You could leave, you had exit rights, and many options to participate at many levels. If you want to see how liberty and community work together for the strengthening of community, Tocqueville’s Democracy in America makes a good case.

But though political liberty increased mightily after that, in some ways — especially in reduction of the tariffs in Britain and France, and the democratization of corporate licensure in America — a number of factors led to a move to statism by the end of the century. Slavery’s suppression in America came at the cost of the old decentralist order, and the rise of nationalism. And everywhere socialist agitation and the labor movement advanced. By the fin de siècle the U.S. was well on the way to progressive statism, starting with a frank imperialism and warfare. We can quibble about the dates and epochal moments, but a turn occurred. The rise of an administrative state in America and Britain made a huge difference; vast bureaus decreasingly controlled by democratic processes meant that a new form of authoritarianism emerged, and also the popularity of wealth transfer programs.

And though authoritarianism is in the question, it was bureaucracies and transfer programs that led to the major hits on community life. Increasingly families were atomized, and individuals, too: free radicals with little to cling onto but the Leviathan State and the political parties that squabble over its control. Nowadays community has withered under the folkways of “bowling alone,” and the scope of statist control of everyday life has greatly increased.

I would call modern society as dominated by statism, with a veneer of democratic control and the actual controls held by the unionized public employee sector, the “Deep State” intelligence agencies, the plutocracy, and the academic/newsmedia/entertainment complex. It strikes me as the opposite of a libertarian system, despite extensive markets (much of it is dirigisme, anyway, and transfer programs completely re-orient society in several anti-social ways). The scope for community has atrophied.

Right now we witness two completely different cultures fighting politically and socially: the explicitly nationalist conservative-progressives against the woke-socialist corporatist progressives. Both of these groups try to get around the tragedy of the commons inherent in a state providing extensive public goods each by finding a way to undermine the scramble for resources by competing ethnic groups. (Pluralistic societies have great trouble finding stability with a maximum state.) The nationalists attempt to build a pan-community melting pot around doctrines of national ideals, symbols, and purpose; the woke folk insist on using ideology to create solidarity among the “ethnic identities” of perceived or defined “out-groups” largely with a goal of unseating in-group people and their traditional hierarchies.

Both of these are fake communities. Both use ideology to promote the solidarity necessary to prevent the tragedy of the commons (overuse of conscript resources, mostly taxes). And the woke-socialist progressives have a revolutionary agenda as well: replacing traditional in-group hierarchies with their own ideological hierarchy.

De-politicized, communities can grow naturally, to meet group needs and express shared values. Politicized, they fight against each other for state resources.

This is necessarily violent, and war has been a necessary component to keep the nationalism going, as should be obvious, while the woke-revolutionary modus is violent by nature, as can be seen in the tyranny of political correctness and in protests that quickly morph into riot and anarchy.

The liberty that libertarians prefer would be much more conducive to peaceful and vibrant community, but that requires reducing the number of public goods provided by state fiat.

And that’s something at which both nationalists and socialists balk.

twv

The crisis of our time may amount to nothing more than no longer being able to fool our enemies, merely ourselves.

twv

Why was Libertarian presidential candidate Jo Jorgensen’s tweet, “It is not enough to be passively not racist, we must be actively anti-racist” so controversial amongst libertarians?

…as answered on Quora….

I just read a number of libertarian answers, and I saw not one mention of the riots associated with Black Lives Matter.

Liberty is not just an opposition to the State — contra Rothbard, who I think was wrong on this. Very wrong. Liberty is the freedom we all can possess; those who initiate force from government, from criminal gangs, or individually, or from mobs all abridge freedom. And libertarians oppose them all. Including mobs. The riots are mob action of an unconscionable kind, and indeed constitute the insurrection of cowards and fools — and they are intimately associated with Black Lives Matter.

One of my goals as a libertarian writer has been to de-mystify gobbledygook and debunk confidence games. Much of statism along with much of ochlocracy (mobocracy) gains support from unrealistic fantasy, regrettable but repeatable error, strategic evasion, and outright lies. So I have no truck with folks who spread untruth combined with vitriol. Black Lives Matter spews lies/error about police killings of ‘unarmed black men.’ Not that this never happens, but that the numbers are simply not that special. The stats do not support the claim. I have a great many complaints about policing in our state-ridden society, but racism does not seem a warranted fixation, at least as regards shootings by the police.* And not irrelevant to this is the fact that nearly every one of the victims BLM lifts up to honor and defend has been a violent criminal killed in the process of resisting arrest** — from Michael Brown on. So, no thank you.

I believe it is the job of libertarians to offer truth as the avenue to peace and justice, not bigotry and error and paranoid fantasy. BLM is all spin and lies and violence, and libertarians supporting it strike me as gullible at best.

There is another reason I found the Jo Jo tweet eye-roll-worthy: if you define racism in a very specific way — a way that most people do not use the term — then it makes at least a modicum of sense. But otherwise, it is an immoral command.

For the essence of liberty isn’t your feelings about people of this race or that, or any race, for that matter. Nor even about discriminating for or against anyone. (Discrimination is a key concept in most folks’ definitions of racism.) Libertarians support freedom of association, and we are against racist discrimination only as it pertains to abridging freedom of association and perverting the unbiased working of the rule of law. Liberty, you see, is for everybody, racist or not. You may hate anyone you like. You just may not initiate force: rob, murder, defraud, etc.

I go further: Liberty is for the racists of all races. We want black anti-white racists as well as white anti-black racists all to co-exist in their separate or interpenetrating spheres (their choice), unmolested.

And the thing about racism? It is just another vice. Like greed or sloth or envy or intemperance. No decent libertarian as libertarian would spout nonsense like “it is not enough to be passively not greedy; we must be actively anti-greed.” And I say this despite thinking that greed, along with envy and a few other vices, is a major driver of both statism and ochlocracy. I think these vices are bigger problems than racism — which is indeed a problem. But being publicly anti-greed is not going to usher in liberty any more than being publicly anti-racist. Libertarians have an answer to a whole bevy of social problems caused by all the vices. It is the idea of justice as equal freedom — in a word, liberty.

Jo Jo and Spike have both proven themselves witless moralists just like conservatives in the days of my youth or the virtue-signaling lily-white progressives who live all around me.

A major disappointment. I probably will not vote for them. Further, I have adopted my old stance regarding the Libertarian Party: liquidationism. That was Murray Rothbard’s term, from the 1980’s, of the position I pushed later, in the 1990’s. Jo Jo and Spike have convinced me that reviving the liquidationist program could be the very best first step forward for a freer society. The Libertarian Party must be destroyed — liquidated — and replaced with one or more organizations far more effective and far less crazy.


* I actually suspect that systemic racism may be a problem, but because it is an invisible hand (unintended) and institutionally tacit process, the subject has to be dealt with very carefully and without a revolutionary mindset. The hatred and fury the concept elicits in leftists and the well-programed young suggest that they cannot think very carefully.

** A key problem in police-black relations is the ubiquity of the illicit drug trade, broken homes caused by a corrupting welfare state, horrendous public schools and insidious business-employment regulation that most people have no clue how they work or why they are bad. Libertarians have of course called attention and opposed these horrific state programs (the War on Drugs; state aid; government schools; the minimum wage, etc.) that have devastated inner-city African-American communities, and are well under way to destroy “white” communities. Further, libertarians have been consistent in opposing the qualified immunity doctrine that protects bad-apple police and corrupts the whole state apple-cart. But among those preventing reform in these areas are the race hustlers, such as the “Reverend” Al Sharpton, who have a confidence game going that requires that blacks not make progress. They gain at their “community’s” expense.

twv

Had heroism and not cowardice been pushed with the pandemic, the young and healthy would have gone about their lives as usual, valiantly doing their part to develop herd immunity, while the aged and the at-risk would have sequestered themselves, or otherwise courted extreme caution.

But a culture of courage does not benefit the State.

Much better a flock of bleating ruminants — and those kept separate, against their nature, allowed to congregate only for media-approved “protests.”

twv